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9.4 Run-on Sentences: Correcting Run-on Sentences

The first way to correct a run-on sentence is to separate the independent clauses into distinct sentences.
Run-on: This is not such an elegant playground, still, the kids love it.
Corrected: This is not such an elegant playground. Still, the kids love it.
To correct a run-on by this method, you need a period to mark the end of one sentence and a capital letter to mark the beginning of the next one.

pencil Application 2

A second method of correcting run-ons is to compound the independent clauses with a conjunction or a semicolon.

Run-on: That dog is the one that helped me he still scares me.
Corrected: That dog is the one that helped me, but he still scares me.

When you compound independent clauses, put a comma in front of the conjunction. Remember that a comma by itself is not enough. Review these conjunctions:

and | for | or | yet 
but | nor | so  
You may compound two clauses with a semicolon (;) in those rare cases where the clauses are so closely related that you don't need another word to show their relationship.
Run-on: By 7:30, it was too late the show had already begun.
Corrected: By 7:30, it was too late; the show had already begun.

pencil Application 3

A third method of correcting run-ons is to take away the independence of one of the clauses by adding a dependent word.
Run-on: I won't pay these bills, you explain them to me right now.
Corrected: I won't pay these bills unless
you explain them to me right away.
When you put a dependent word in front of one clause, you deprive it of its independence and allow it to become embedded in the other clause. (See Chapter 5.) The dependent words who, whose, which, and that are special. When one of these introduces a clause, it replaces a word in the process:
Run-on: This is Myrella's winning lottery ticket, she bought it at Corsetti's Market.
Corrected: This is Myrella's winning lottery ticket which she bought it at Corsetti's Market.
pencil Application 4

A final method of correcting run-on sentences is to reduce one independent clause to a verbal or verbal phrase.
Run-on: The icicles were melting they dripped into the bucket below.
Corrected, using a verbal: The melting icicles dripped into the bucket below.

Run-on: The sun was moving slowly to the south side of the house it thawed the roof gutters.
Corrected, using a verbal phrase: Moving slowly to the south side of the house, the sun thawed the roof gutters.

When you reduce a clause to a verbal or a verbal phrase, you can embed it in the remaining independent clause. (See Chapter 5.) This method doesn't work with all run-on sentences, but when it does, it packs the combined ideas efficiently into a small number of words.

pencil Application 5      

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