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chapter 7.3 Combining Sentences: Sentence Combining Summary

You can combine sentences by compounding two or more sentence parts that play the same sentence role.

A conjunction can connect subject with subject, verb with verb, completer with completer, or modifier with modifier. You may wish to review here:

In the example below, the conjunction connects two verbs:

Those blues tunes haunt me. Those blues tunes don't change my mind.
Those blues tunes haunt me but don't change my mind.
Application 2
You can combine sentences by embedding one within another.

A dependent word can take away a clause's independence and embed it in an independent clause. See "From Independent to Dependent Clause" in Chapter 5.

Those blues tunes haunt me. You play them on your trombone.
Those blues tunes haunt me when you play them on your trombone.
Application 3
A verb can be reduced to a verbal and embedded in another sentence alone or as a verbal phrase. See "From Verb to Verbal" in Chapter 5.

Those blues tunes are haunting. They echo constantly through my brain.
Those haunting blues tunes echo constantly through my brain.
OR
Haunting me, those blues tunes echo constantly through my brain.
Application 4
You can combine sentences by compounding them.

A conjunction with a comma before it connects two independent sentences:

Those blues tunes are haunting me. I don't want you to stop playing.
Those blues tunes are haunting me, but I don't want you to stop playing.
Application 5


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